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Cover Reveal: The Encyclopedia Sharksploitanica!

It’s been a long hard few months hasn’t it? Summer seems like it’s forever away. And you can’t even go to the beaches because of a fucking virus! Well, maybe this will help. Maybe the cover reveal for the upcoming ENCYCLOPEDIA SHARKSPLOITANICA from none other than our very own marine biologist and horror author Susan Snyder!

This incredible book will gather together her reviews, her articles on terrible shark biology, and her shark based poetry! But that isn’t all! It will also include never before seen commentary, interviews, articles, and more! You do not want to miss this, so grab yourself a waterproof kindle and jump into the ocean to spend the summer inside an inflated swim bladder with Susan Snider!

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The Return of the Revenge of Horror Comics: Adaptations

S A L T C I T Y S H I V E R S

In a previous post for Madness Heart (“Ink Stained: Two Memories of Horror Comics”) I wrote about my love affair with horror comics, which began in my middle school years and continues to this day. In particular, pioneering horror comic company EC Comics made an impact on me – and not just on me. As I wrote:

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Virus Shark: A Low Budget Fun Mutation

I give Mark Polonia a hard time. A lot. He has made some of the worst shark movies known to mankind. There are, however, a couple gems hidden in the dung pile. Movies that just hit me the right way and despite their obvious flaws, win me right over. Sharkenstein is one of these. I’ve found another with the brand new 2021 movie, Virus Shark!

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Reed Alexander’s Horror Review of ‘Stir of Echoes’

Tommy has The Shinning…

In my review of White Noise (2005), I asked the question, “why watch that when you can watch this instead?” They were very similar in style and even plot, but White Noise was pretty lame. I mean, it was okay, but not really worth the watch. This one is so much better AND it has Kevin Bacon in it.

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Horror and Dollcraft: Thomas Ligotti, Eugene Thacker, and Stephen Graham Jones

S A L T C I T Y S H I V E R S

Blessed are those with a voice. If dolls could speak, no doubt they would scream, “I didn’t want to be human!”

– Motoko Kusanagi, Ghost in the Shell 2: Innocence

The oldest undisputed depiction of a human being is the so-called Venus of Hohle Fels, which was crafted between 33,000 and 40,000 years ago. The zoomorphic, lion-headed Löwenmensch figurine is even older, being between 35,000 and 40,000 years old. Dolls – which is to say, human figures carved as toys rather than objects of veneration – date to at least the 21st century BCE, with examples scattered throughout the world’s ancient archeological sites. For practically as long as our species has biologically been human, we have crafted self-representations: replications of the human form in wood, stone, mammoth tusk, and every other medium available to us.

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A “Saltie” Crocsploitation Double Feature Part Two: Black Water: Abyss

Welcome back! You read part one, right? Good for you. Or I’m sorry. Depends on how you feel. 

We continue our odyssey into the wet and wild world of living dinosaurs with Aussie director Andrew Traucki’s follow up to his 2007 cult hit crocsploitation flic, Black Water. This one is unexpectedly yet expectedly called Black Water: Abyss and was released in everyone’s favorite year, 2020. I’m not sure this is a sequel. I mean, it could be but there isn’t really a connection to the first movie much at all. Other than the croc, of course. 

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Dracula: Blood and Soil

S A L T C I T Y S H I V E R S

The genesis of Bram Stoker’s Dracula is sometimes traced to the 15th Century – specifically, to 1462, when Vlad Drăculea, Voivode (Warlord) of Wallachia seized a Saxon town called Târgoviște and murdered the entire populace in the most gruesome manner imaginable. This, however, is a mistake: other than his name and his potent cocktail of aristocracy and cruelty, Drăculea lent very little to Dracula. The real genesis of Stoker’s masterpiece can perhaps be traced to the earliest German “best sellers,” many of which contained legendary accounts of Vlad’s sadism – and those accounts no doubt influenced Stoker when he was researching Dracula between 1890 and 1897 (although Stoker first heard the Vlad Drăculea legend in 1881).

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